Happy Juneteenth!

Our own Bernie Henderson, president-elect, was featured today in the Richmond Times-Dispatch.  Well done, Bernie!

Celebrate Juneteenth as Freedom Day for all

BernieAs a white male Southerner who is just days away from his 70th birthday, I am excited that Juneteenth might become a state holiday in Virginia.

Since I was a child, I have had the belief that unless all people are free, none of us is free. Juneteenth is a benchmark for the beginning of freedom in our nation. It is where our work in progress legally began. While Juneteenth’s significance to African American citizens is paramount, there is no better time for all of us to celebrate freedom.

We can continue to refer to it as Juneteenth, just as we know what the Fourth of July is. But as I prefer to refer to the Fourth of July as Independence Day, I personally am going to refer to Juneteenth as Freedom Day. On the Fourth of July, we celebrate our nation’s independence; on Juneteenth, we celebrate our citizens’ freedom.

Juneteenth and the Fourth of July — Freedom Day and Independence Day. We have a lot to celebrate and a lot of work to do.

– Bernard L. Henderson Jr.

Diversity

One of The Shepherd’s Center of Richmond’s guiding principles is that “we seek to be welcoming, inclusive, and diverse.”  The demonstrations over the past weeks have stressed the importance of this principle.  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. said that “All progress is precarious, and the solution of one problem brings us face to face with another problem.”  We must be determined to face each of life’s problems and find solutions that honor all people.

The tragic deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and many more have triggered anger, hurt, fear, confusion and despair throughout the world.  At The Shepherd’s Center of Richmond our hearts and prayers go out to the black community, our black TSCOR families and the families of those who have been directly affected by the senseless acts of violence we have witnessed on our TV screens.  When one hurts, we all hurt.  That statement is no truer than at this moment.

As an organization we stand committed to embracing all people in our community.  Our priority is to provide a service to the generation that has laid the foundation for future generations. It is because of the wisdom, care, and guidance of our senior population that we find ourselves dedicated to creating programs that give them independence and love during their later years.

TSCOR is focused on creating diversity within our organization.  In 2018, a Diversity Committee was formed.  The committee’s goal is to attract and include a more diverse membership and offer services to neighborhoods that we have not impacted in the past.  The committee started its initiative last year by meeting with several churches and black leaders to strategize how TSCOR can align itself with urban neighborhoods.  And we plan to continue this effort.

In 2019, the Board of Directors unanimously elected TSCOR’s first black board member, Stephanie Churchill.  Just recently, she was elected to serve as Vice President (and thus as President-elect) beginning July 1, 2020.   We believe that Stephanie will bring unique, forward-thinking ideas that can be used to help grow and expand TSCOR.

Our pledge to our community is to do all we can to represent diversity and inclusion in fulfilling our mission to encourage older adults to remain active and independent through enrichment programs and volunteer service to their peers.

P.S. to Resources for You

It seems that the email version of my posts about Betsy’s course doesn’t like her photo – it keeps sending a link in its place.  So sorry!  Here is the information without the photo.  To see Betsy’s picture, it is displaying correctly on the “Blog/Latest News” tab on our website.

Online Art History: More than Just Stuff: Understanding Signs & Symbols in Paintings, Part 1

Friday, March 27, 12:00 pm ET (11:00 am CT)

Presented by Betsy Solomon, MA, Art Historian;  Executive Director, Shepherd’s Center of Webster-Kirkwood;  Chair, Shepherd’s Centers of America

Description: Animals, plants and objects of all kinds – these items are not simply incidental details in paintings.  They reveal layers of meaning that help us to fully understand masterworks.  We will explore the meaning that lies beneath symbols in a selection of well known, and a few lesser known, works of art.

To sign-up:

You will receive an email back with instructions on how to login to Zoom for the online lecture on your computer or smart phone.

Some Resources for You

I’ve been keeping my eyes open for useful things to share with everyone.  The first search was for were those free Ivy League courses that I heard about on the news.  This search led me to an NPR article that had a link for those courses, as well as a whole bunch of other incredible links to Broadway, music, fitness and even sports. To read the article Getting Bored? Here’s A List Of Free Things That Weren’t Free Before Coronavirus, click on the title and enjoy!

I got an email from a board member the other morning, telling me about a very timely article: I Spent a Year in Space, and I Have Tips on Isolation to Share, by astronaut Scott Kelly.  A good read and sage advice!

I also want to reiterate the offering I told you about in my previous post.  The executive director of a fellow Shepherd’s Center (yes, we are a part of a national network of almost 60 Shepherd’s Centers) is offering an online art history course this Friday.  See the details below.  I will be in attendance!  Sending well wishes to all!  Take good care – Julie

Online Art History: More than Just Stuff: Understanding Signs & Symbols in Paintings, Part 1

https://files.constantcontact.com/8dcbc87a401/ba5cac07-a352-4009-89ea-b103a7a611f5.jpgFriday, March 27, 12:00 pm ET (11:00 am CT)

Presented by Betsy Solomon, MA, Art Historian;  Executive Director, Shepherd’s Center of Webster-Kirkwood;  Chair, Shepherd’s Centers of America

Description: Animals, plants and objects of all kinds – these items are not simply incidental details in paintings.  They reveal layers of meaning that help us to fully understand masterworks.  We will explore the meaning that lies beneath symbols in a selection of well known, and a few lesser known, works of art.

To sign-up:

You will receive an email back with instructions on how to login to Zoom for the online lecture on your computer or smart phone.

Shepherd’s Center Network Happening

Missing the Open University?  Well, one of our network centers is offering a free online Adventures in Learning class (this is what a lot of Shepherd’s Centers call their lifelong learning programs). Join Betsy Solomon this Friday, March 27 at 12:00 pm ET (11:00 am CT). Registration details are listed below. Participants need to download the Zoom app on their smart phone or computer, and register with Betsy. Both the class and Zoom are free.

Online Art History: More than Just Stuff: Understanding Signs & Symbols in Paintings, Part 1

https://files.constantcontact.com/8dcbc87a401/ba5cac07-a352-4009-89ea-b103a7a611f5.jpgPresented by Betsy Solomon, MA, Art Historian;   Executive Director, Shepherd’s Center of Webster-Kirkwood;   Chair, Shepherd’s Centers of America

Description: Animals, plants and objects of all kinds – these items are not simply incidental details in paintings.  They reveal layers of meaning that help us to fully understand masterworks.  We will explore the meaning that lies beneath symbols in a selection of well known, and a few lesser known, works of art.

Friday, March 27, 12:00 pm ET (11:00 am CT)

To sign-up:

You will receive an email back with instructions on how to login to Zoom for the online lecture on your computer or smart phone.

Welcome to our new LLC

I know that many of you have met her, but we would like to officially welcome Erin Reibel, our Lifelong Learning Coordinator (LLC), to The Shepherd’s Center.

She will be at the Open University and Lunch and Life, as well as behind the scenes, helping us to offer Richmond’s lifelong learners one of the best programs in the area.

So, if you haven’t introduced yourself, please do!